In Movements, One is the Magic Number

All it takes is one person to start a movement. That’s right, I said one person. Not 100 influencers, not 50 mommy bloggers, and not 1000 ambassadors. One. Person. Is all it takes.

But that one person has to be committed. They have to not care what others think. They have to have enough passion that they can do their own thing. And once they are out there, giving it all that they’ve got, they can’t help but attract kindred spirits who join the cause and start giving it all they’ve got as well.

The following is a video from the 2009 Sasquatch Music Festival at the end of last month. Do you think this guy is an influencer? Or just someone who HAS to do his thing?

Remember, it only takes one.

  • Nikki

    This is possibly one of best examples of the “tipping point” I have ever seen. It’s amazing to see people literally RUN to be apart of this.

    And, to answer your question, the influencers are really the first few people who join him. They make it cool. The communicated to everyone, “Hey, you should be a part of this.”

    Great post.

  • http://www.umbrae.net Chris Dary

    What a great video, and message!

    I think the hardest part of being the one passionate guy in the room is sticking to it – without dedication that flame can be snuffed out before it has a chance to really catch. You’ve gotta be your own mascot.

    I’ve never heard any really great advice on how to keep motivation up during that early time. If you’ve got any thoughts on that, I’d love to hear it! I think if people can commit themselves better we’d have a lot more progress in society as a whole.

    Thanks for the thought provoking post, Spike!

  • http://buildingmarketingstrategies.wordpress.com/ Rick Hardy

    I love it! You made my day. There’s just such great energy in this video. And your point is well-taken. If only it was this easy in life. Remember, the culture of that event allowed for that to happen. Unfortunately, that’s usually not the case. So it requires great courage to be the one dancing by yourself, as this guy had. Thanks for this post!

  • http://brainsonfire.com Spike

    Thanks for the comments, everyone.

    Rick, you’re right. It’s the environment. So I would say that it’s the challenge of your company to create that environment. It’s not easy at all – and all great movements take a lot of hard work. But if that company is willing to create a culture that invites a movement, then you’ve taken the first step on a journey that never ends. And that’s a great thing.

  • http://www.cropgirl.wordpress.com stephenie

    Yup… get it! Love it!

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  • http://www.business901.com Joseph T. Dager

    I was commenting on a tweet that linked to this as I was watching it and saying no that you need 2, but 30 seconds into it, I stopped and re-typed GR8 RT, MUST SEE VIDEO

    Nice find, great comments and how true!

  • http://www.likeawarmcupofcoffee.blogspot.com Sarah Mae

    AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • http://LisasScrapSite Lisa Simpson

    Great video,he made me want to get up and dance.LOL,UNSTOPABLE

  • Kelly Jo

    Great video. Even if his ‘movement’ didn’t get others to join in, he still had FUN!!!

  • Tea’

    Reminds me of my drunk Sister In Law at the last family wedding we attended. She was toasted but everyone followed her around like puppies.

  • Liz

    Great find indeed. But my favorite pre-dates this one by 22 years. Patrick Dempsey in Can’t Buy Me Love and his version of the African Anteater ritual. People may follow a person that is committed and passionate because they are kindred spirits as you say, but they also follow because they have a desperate need to feel included. No one wants to be the one left sitting on the hill not dancing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxIrQPffSIg

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